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Author Topic: new from Newton, 73 CB500  (Read 2020 times)
lajos
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« on: May 27, 2015, 04:43:29 PM »

Hello-

A member on SOHC4 pointed me to this forum. My name is Lajos and live in Newton.

I purchased a 73 CB500 project two weeks ago with an extra 550 motor. Took everything apart, found a lot of rust in the cylinders so it's currently at the machine shop waiting to be bored to 600cc. Hoping with that and some borrowed parts from the 500 motor I have everything for the engine.

I have two carbs, both in pretty bad shape from white dust and pitting. Maybe I can make one good one from the two.

The frame is in good shape with some rust here and there.

Between the cylinder rust, the carb rust and missing parts, this will probably keep me busy longer than expected...

-Lajos

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andy750
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« Reply #1 on: May 27, 2015, 06:05:09 PM »

Welcome Lajos and glad you found your way over here from the main forum!  You have plenty of local help around should you need it. What machine shop are you using?

cheers
Andy
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knowsnothing
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« Reply #2 on: May 27, 2015, 06:58:40 PM »

Hey Lajos,

Welcome.  Glad you made it over here.  Like Andy said, there are a bunch of local guys around that have a lot of knowledge and love to help.  

when you rebuild those carbs, make sure to keep all of the bits together with the carb it came from and reuse as much as possible.  When I do it, the only things I replace are the o rings and gaskets.  Everything else should clean up.  Good luck.

Treeve from Quincy
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"Go soothingly on the grease mud, as there lurks the skid demon"
lajos
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« Reply #3 on: May 27, 2015, 09:11:22 PM »

Somebody recommended Nashua Engine Rebuilders so that's where I took the cylinders.

The cylinder head that I have has a little bit of pitting on one of the intake valve seats so I didn't commit to that head yet. Waiting for another head to arrive in the mail this Friday. Although the machine shop dudes said they can also fix the one I have already. I'll just pick the better one Wink

Currently the carbs are not ready yet... the float pins are all stuck solid. I don't want to mess with them until I give them a day soaking.

You guys have some beautiful bikes, I'd love to some in real life! Are there any meetups/rides?
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andy750
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« Reply #4 on: May 28, 2015, 08:36:38 AM »

Hey Lajos

No idea what Nashua Engine rebuilders are like but I do know that local to Boston Mike Rieck (MRieck on main forum and here) is one of the best SOHC engine guys in the country/world. If thats enough for excellent machine work you cant get better than Harrys Machine parts run by Rick Stetson (Northborough) or our very own Anders up in Candia,NH. Anyway good luck with your engine!

We usually meet up once a month for a beer night at some local establishment and we do have the occasional rides (Spring Ride just passed and Fall Ride are guaranteed) - rides are usually impromptu weekend events with a few guys getting out. Just PM and ask someone to go for a ride or post it here in the Events section.

June beer night is coming up and when you get that bike running let us know ready for the first ride!

cheers
Andy
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« Reply #5 on: May 28, 2015, 10:57:21 AM »


Currently the carbs are not ready yet... the float pins are all stuck solid. I don't want to mess with them until I give them a day soaking.


Be careful removing those pins.  The posts are known to break when trying to get the pins out if you are too rough.  Make sure to support the post before trying to punch a pin out.  Also, be careful about soaking the whole carb bodies.  I think there are felt washers and sometimes tiny stuck o rings that something like Berrymans will chew up (don't ask me how i know).  If you are using simple green, it will discolor the carb bodies if left too long. 

-Treeve
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lajos
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« Reply #6 on: May 28, 2015, 03:58:57 PM »

Thanks for the suggestion. I was going to simple green the carbs, but only after I take them apart. Right now they are sprayed with pb blaster, hopefully I can get those pins out in a couple days.

I managed to snap the last cylinder stud. Bummer.

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azure
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« Reply #7 on: May 28, 2015, 07:32:40 PM »

Probably a good idea to replace those with heavy duty APE cylinder studs.
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lajos
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« Reply #8 on: May 28, 2015, 09:09:56 PM »

Yes that's my plan, given that I can get this stud out. Tried to torch it, welded a nut on and the impact wrench sheared another 1/4" off the stud with the welded on bolt. Stud is in there rock solid.
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« Reply #9 on: May 29, 2015, 10:37:17 AM »

There is always one that doesn't cooperate... Angry  Luckily it broke above the case.  Patience is your friend.  Heat it, tap it, soak it, rinse and repeat.  I had one stuck that took about 2 weeks before it budged.  If there is enough meat left, weld another nut and use vice grips at the same time.  Sometimes tightening just a touch will break the bond and then you can loosen it.  If its not moving, don't try to force it.  Breaking it flush will increase the headache and the $$ involved (EDM).  Again don't ask me how i know  Lips Sealed
« Last Edit: May 29, 2015, 10:45:57 AM by knowsnothing » Logged

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lajos
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« Reply #10 on: May 29, 2015, 09:57:22 PM »

Thanks for the advice, Treeve.

I'm currently on the 5th welded nut, this time I welded a washer to the top of the stud and then a nut to the washer, then filled in the middle.

That sucker won't budge. I heated the stud with a propane torch to red several times, then used a heat gun to heat up the whole area. Went through half a bottle of pb blaster, also tried something called liquid wrench.

As you said, don't want the stud to break any shorter.

Now I'm giving it a rest for the night.
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Alan F.
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« Reply #11 on: May 30, 2015, 10:39:28 AM »

....I heated the stud with a propane torch to red several times....

I hate to be the one to say it, and I hope it isn't so, but if I remember my old shop teacher explaining heat treating and annealing processes... You may have softened that stud by heating it and letting it slowly cool at room temperature.

http://www.efunda.com/processes/heat_treat/softening/annealing.cfm

Again I hope I'm wrong, and just a little back and forth turning as Treeve said is all you'll need after sufficient soak time.
Heating the case around the stud may help also.
Alan
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lajos
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« Reply #12 on: May 30, 2015, 07:57:08 PM »

Hi Alan-

Thanks for the concern about heating the stud. I'm concerned about it, too Wink

I got this advice from old timers on SOHC4, here's my project thread: http://forums.sohc4.net/index.php/topic,148166.0.html

As long as I don't mess up the case I'm good with experimenting with torching. I figure if I completely mess up the stud I take it to a machine shop and have them weld/drill it out or put a sleeve in there.
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Robbo22
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« Reply #13 on: June 01, 2015, 05:02:45 PM »

This may be a long shot but I have heard that a 50/50 mix of ATF and Acetone works well on loosening bolts
http://www.jalopyjournal.com/forum/threads/best-penetrating-oil-for-stuck-nuts-bolts.773380/

Rob
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