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Author Topic: Anyone use these?  (Read 109 times)
azure
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« on: July 28, 2017, 05:35:06 AM »

https://www.decibullz.com/product/custom-molded-earplugs/
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frostypuck
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« Reply #1 on: July 28, 2017, 07:01:01 AM »

Not that brand specifically, but I got some molded earplugs at a twisted throttle event once. I stopped using them after I got some $9 skullcandy in ear earbuds that do a great job at ambient noise isolation, and are multi-purpose. I use them on the bike (with or without music), mowing the lawn with music, on flights and watching movies on my laptop. I was actually telling someone yesterday that I'm worried that these will fail soon after 5 years of hard use and I wont be able to replace them.
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azure
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« Reply #2 on: July 28, 2017, 02:33:33 PM »

what interests me about these, Chris, is that they really don't fit in the ear canal, but cover the area superficial to it, like an external plug, I understand.

I also have some fitted silicone plugs, but they are not headphones like yours, which are very nice.

All best to you!
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Alan F.
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« Reply #3 on: July 29, 2017, 10:35:03 AM »

They do seem interesting but I never did see an actual noise reduction rating anywhere on their website so I could compare them directly to other earplugs.

Then I found this which leaves me uneasy:

"-The EPA has selected the Noise Reduction Rating as the descriptor of hearing protector effectiveness to be utilized on the labels required by U.S. EPA Regulation 40 CFR Part 211 Subpart B. Decibullz makes no warranties as to the suitability of NRR as a measure of the actual protection afforded to the individual user."


EDIT... It's on the box in the photos, NRR 31
« Last Edit: July 29, 2017, 12:36:25 PM by Alan F. » Logged
azure
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« Reply #4 on: July 29, 2017, 09:29:28 PM »

I am not sure why an independent rating, by the EPA, makes you uneasy Alan? A 31 db reduction is significant, as each 3 db is a perceived as half of the initial sound pressure, although this gives no sense of the frequency band that is reduced. In general, high frequency is cut more than lower frequency, due to the proportional relationship of sound pressure to wave length. Highs are what is most easy lost, while too much low frequency input has a tiring effect, at least on me. And that is the sum total of what I think I know on this subject! Grin
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frostypuck
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« Reply #5 on: July 30, 2017, 11:01:22 AM »

I think he meant that the noise reduction info wasn't evident on the company's website was making him uneasy.
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azure
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« Reply #6 on: July 30, 2017, 12:50:18 PM »

Thanks Chris. The site and protectors were recommended by some shooting acquaintances. 31db of noise reduction, probably across a spectrum of 400hz to 20khz, including much of the pink noise that characterizes wind above 30mph, which is what I suppose passive devices are capable of diminishing, is about as good as it gets.
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Alan F.
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« Reply #7 on: July 31, 2017, 10:05:06 AM »

...Alan?

Sorry, all I wanted was a Pepsi....

I think he meant that the noise reduction info wasn't evident on the company's website was making him uneasy.

Yes that was it, no NRR value listed that I could find, combined with some legal jargon attempting to invalidate the very NRR concept.
31's should be fine for most riding, for some workshop activities I use 33's to protect what hearing I have left.
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azure
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« Reply #8 on: July 31, 2017, 12:00:32 PM »

Hi Alan,

I am very concerned about what is left of mine too! For riding I can't use the phase shifting headphones commonly used to lower sound pressure across the audible spectrum, so I am wondering what you have that lowers 33db?
Thanks!!
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frostypuck
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« Reply #9 on: July 31, 2017, 06:10:37 PM »

Just for reference- I use these when I'm doing a hobby that might produce loud, intermittent bangs! within 2-3 feet from your ears Obviously this is not practical for motorcycling, but as a comparison, these are a NRR of 20 for almost 5X the price. And require batteries that I never have on hand because I always forget to shut them off...
However my intermittent loud noise hobby is probably only around 75-80 dB for a fraction of a second, so the NRR of these headphones drops that to under the noisy office that I'm exposed to 60 hrs a week.

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Alan F.
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« Reply #10 on: August 01, 2017, 12:23:02 AM »

Hi Alan, what you have that lowers 33db?
Thanks!!

These are also available at walmart, they're not half bad.

http://www.earplugstore.com/flents-quiet-time-ear-plugs-bottle.html

I just found that website, there seems to be quite a lot there.
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azure
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« Reply #11 on: August 01, 2017, 03:25:02 PM »

33db cut over a very limited spectrum, be careful with those, I do not believe they will protect you from wind noise. My $.002
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Alan F.
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« Reply #12 on: August 03, 2017, 08:01:05 PM »

I think you'very got me there. The more I read, the more conflicting info I find.

My conclusion is not to choose earplugs based solely on NRR value, because different materials block or filter different frequencies better than others.
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azure
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« Reply #13 on: August 04, 2017, 06:56:27 AM »

i think wind is the primary thing we want to block, save perhaps badly sung song notes while we ride?

If so, it appears that the frequencies that make up the wind become higher pitched and louder as our speed is increased.

Foam plugs are Ok with high pitched noise, so they are helpful if one can get them in deeply enough.

It would be great if someone came out with a phase cancellation system, similar to the noise reduction headphones made by Bose and others, that could be used in helmet.

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