Much preferred!

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azure:
Rather than saying goodbye to an important member of this forum as he prepares his departure tomorrow, I prefer greatly to think about the forum's latest international subscriber from Grenoble. Best wishes and safe travels, Peter!

Connito:
Thanks, Ben!

andy750:
I am looking forward to seeing what he will be riding in Grenoble and where! Alps Trip anyone?

Bon voyage!
cheers
Andy

Alan F.:
Safe travels Pete!

azure:
The alps are calling to me too Andy. Last week I rode to Andorra and Catalonia, across the Pyrenees on the smallest roads my GPS could find. Although there was little other human traffic, almost every other bike I saw was a decked out Beemer GS. I was on my dear friend, an old r1100rs. One other rider passed me and caught my attention. I later found her name to be Anny Deim, from Austria. In my estimation, and I no longer consider myself either strong or a strong rider, a dual purpose bike is not necessary to enjoy the alpine terrain. I frequently take my GSXR into the high Basque country, on gravel and dirt shepard's paths, and it is not too difficult, albeit requiring care. One doesn't want to ride top fast or too aggressively up high for twp reasons, IMHO. First, there is too much to look at, the scenery is magnificent, and one feels on top of the world. Secondly, and more importantly perhaps, if you hurt yourself up there, even though I carry a portable phone, keeping track of distinguishing and communicable landmarks to help guide a rescue team is tough. Signage is very limited, GPS, if accurate is probably best.

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