My Rickman Partz!!

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Alan F.:
Quote from: azure on January 23, 2011, 10:40:40 PM

I've been replacing hardware with stainless whenever I need to. While it's not original, it is well made and I don't worry about the heads coming off due to over-torquing in the past.


Ben are you familliar with the differences in torque specs between a stainless bolt and a steel bolt of the same size? I couldn't find a decent comparison chart, but here's a pretty good chart for metric stainless screws. http://www.fastenal.com/content/feds/pdf/Torque%20of%20Metric%20Stainless%20Steel.pdf
Alan

phactory:
No stainless hardware for me ever!

Phil

frostypuck:
Quote from: phactory on January 23, 2011, 10:24:07 PM

Well the EPA is certainly doing their damnedest to get rid of them all. BASTARDS!!


Or you could live in india, where the rivers virtually chrome plate themselves. Many of my customers in my last job were plating shops all over MA, RI, and CT. They've just moved from car bumpers to computer components. If you want a comprehensive list, just ask, there's still plenty around, they've just become more specialized.

phactory:
Chris,

 I am looking for platers who do cadmium more than chrome. That is the problem, but I would definitely like to check out your list.

Thanks, Phil

P.S. When were you in India? I would love to go there someday!

azure:
Quote from: Alan F. on January 23, 2011, 11:02:58 PM

Quote from: azure on January 23, 2011, 10:40:40 PM

I've been replacing hardware with stainless whenever I need to. While it's not original, it is well made and I don't worry about the heads coming off due to over-torquing in the past.


Ben are you familliar with the differences in torque specs between a stainless bolt and a steel bolt of the same size? I couldn't find a decent comparison chart, but here's a pretty good chart for metric stainless screws. http://www.fastenal.com/content/feds/pdf/Torque%20of%20Metric%20Stainless%20Steel.pdf
Alan



OK, OK, hold up. Here's what I know. Steel is defined as an alloy containing carbon in varying degrees. Increasing the carbon content causes increase hardening of the steel, or less deformation to impact forces, but also reduces the modulus of elasticity. That is of concern to us as that means that there will be less elastic deformation under torquing stresses before breakage occurs. Stainless will deform more easily, but I believe it has a higher modulus of elasticity. It does not corrode in the same way mild or hi carbon steel does as it has a lower iron content,which also means it's less magnetic,  but does gall easily, and anti seize compound sis a good idea, especially when being mated with other metals.
This is all confused by the fact that the alloys used in making all steels are myriad, and there is no standard for composition.
Generally:
Mild steel contains 0.160.29% carbon.
Carbon steel has a carbon content in the range of 0.301.70% by weight.
Stainless steel has a minimum of 11% chromium content by mass.

This article has some good info:
http://www.epsovens.com/heat-treat-headlines/understanding-the-carbon-steel-grade-system/4

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